Short-term outcomes and complications of damage control and definitive laparotomy in deployed combat environments: 2002 to 2011

Thomas A. Mitchell, Cynthia L. Lauer, James K. Aden, Kurt D. Edwards, Jeffrey A. Bailey, Christopher E. White, Lorne H. Blackbourne, John B. Holcomb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Introduction: Damage control laparotomy (DCL) in an austere environment is an evolving surgical modality. Methods: A retrospective evaluation of all patients surviving 24 hours who underwent a laparotomy from 2002 to 2011 in Iraq and Afghanistan was performed. DCL was defined as a patient undergoing laparotomy at two distinct North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Role 2 or 3 medical treatment facilities (MTFs); a NATO Roles 2 and 3 MTFs, and/or having the International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification procedure code 54.12, for reopening of recent laparotomy site. Definitive laparotomy (DL) was defined as patients undergoing one operative procedure at one NATO Role 2 or 3 MTF. Demographic data including injury severity scores, hematological transfusion, mortality, intraperitoneal or retroperitoneal operative interventions, and complications were compared. Results: DCL composed of 26.5% (n = 331) of all 1,248 laparotomies performed between March 2002 and September 2011. Total intra-abdominal, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and thromboembolic complications for DCL versus DL were 8.5% and 5.6% (p = 0.07), 2.1% and 0.8% (p = 0.06), and 1.5% and 0.7% (p = 0.17), respectively. Theater discharge mortality from DCL and DL were 1.5% (n =5),and1.4%(n = 13) (p = 0.90), respectively. Conclusions: In conclusion, excluding deaths with the first 24 hours, DCL and DL had comparable mortality and complication rates at NATO Roles 2 and 3 MTFs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)277-282
Number of pages6
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume181
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2016
Externally publishedYes

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    Mitchell, T. A., Lauer, C. L., Aden, J. K., Edwards, K. D., Bailey, J. A., White, C. E., Blackbourne, L. H., & Holcomb, J. B. (2016). Short-term outcomes and complications of damage control and definitive laparotomy in deployed combat environments: 2002 to 2011. Military medicine, 181(3), 277-282. https://doi.org/10.7205/MILMED-D-14-00726