Short-and Long-Term Effects of Ambient Ozone and Fine Particulate Matter on the Respiratory Health of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Subjects

Mbabazi Kariisa, Randi Foraker, Michael Pennell, Timothy Buckley, Philip Diaz, Gerard J. Criner, J. R. Wilkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

To date, no study has evaluated the short-and long-term effects air pollution exposure on emphysematous subjects who have undergone lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS). Data from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial study (1998-2003) included 1,218 subjects, aged 39 to 84. Daily values of ambient fine particulate matter (aerodynamic diameter < 2.5 m; PM2.5) and ozone were obtained. Mixed-effects models tested the association between short-and long-term pollutant concentrations and changes in pulmonary function. Cumulative air pollution exposure was strongly associated with worsened respiratory function and symptoms. Mean PM2.5 was associated with poorer lung function. Lagged exposures were poorly associated with respiratory health outcomes. There were detrimental respiratory and pulmonary effects observed in response to even low levels of ambient air pollutants among study participants. These results are indicative that exposures even below those of air quality standards may still pose significant risks to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) subjects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)56-62
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Environmental and Occupational Health
Volume70
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • COPD
  • air pollution
  • lung function
  • spirometry

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