Short- And Long-Term biologic variability of galectin-3 and other cardiac biomarkers in patients with stable heart failure and healthy adults

Emily I. Schindler, Jeffrey J. Szymanski, Karl G. Hock, Edward M. Geltman, Mitchell G. Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Galectin-3 (Gal-3) has been suggested as a prognostic biomarker in heart failure (HF) patients that may better reflect disease progression than traditional markers, including B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and cardiac troponins. To fully establish the utility of any biomarker in HF, its biologic variability must be characterized. METHODS: To assess biologic variability, 59 patients were prospectively recruited, including 23 male and 16 female patients with stable HF and 10 male and 10 female healthy individuals. Gal-3, BNP, and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I (hs-cTnI) were assayed at 5 time points within a 3-week period to assess short-term biologic variability. Long-term (3-month) biologic variability was assessed with samples collected at enrollment and after 4, 8, and 12 weeks. RESULTS: Among healthy individuals, mean short-term biologic variability, expressed as intraindividual CV (CVI), was 4.5% for Gal-3, 29.0% for BNP, and 14.5% for hs-cTnI; long-term biologic variability was 5.5% for Gal-3, 34.7% for BNP, and 14.7% for hscTnI. In stable HF patients, mean short-term biologic variability was 7.1% for Gal-3, 22.5% for BNP, and 8.5% for hs-cTnI, and mean long-term biologic variability was 7.7% for Gal-3, 27.6% for BNP, and 9.6% for hs-cTnI. CONCLUSIONS: The finding that Gal-3 has minimal intraindividual biological variability adds to its potential as a useful biomarker in HF patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)360-366
Number of pages7
JournalClinical chemistry
Volume62
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2016

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