Sensitive ultrasonic delineation of steroid treatment in living dystrophic mice with energy-based and entropy-based radio frequency signal processing

Kirk D. Wallace, Jon N. Marsh, Steven L. Baldwin, Anne M. Connolly, Richard Keeling, Gregory M. Lanza, Samuel A. Wickline, Michael S. Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe wasting disease, involving replacement of necrotic muscle tissue by fibrous material and fatty infiltrates. One primary animal model of this human disease is the X chromosomelinked mdx strain of mice. The goals of the present work were to validate and quantify the capability of both energy and entropy metrics of radio-frequency ultrasonic backscatter to differentiate among normal, dystrophic, and steroidtreated skeletal muscle in the mdx model. Thirteen 12month-old mice were blocked into three groups: 4 treated mdx-dystrophic that received daily subcutaneous steroid (prednisolone) treatment for 14 days, 4 positive-control mdx-dystrophic that received saline injections for 14 days, and 5 negative-control animals. Biceps muscle of each animal was imaged in vivo using a 40-MHz center frequency transducer in conjunction with a Vevo-660 ultrasound system. Radio-frequency data were acquired (1 GHz, 8 bits) corresponding to a sequence of transverse images, advancing the transducer from "shoulder" to "elbow" in 100-micron steps. Data were processed to generate both "integrated backscatter" (log energy), and "entropy" (information theoretic receiver, H f) representations. Analyses of the integrated-backscatter values delineated both treatedand untreated-mdx biceps from normal controls (p < 0.01). Complementary analyses of the entropy images differentiated the steroid-treated and positive-control mdx groups (p < 0.01). To our knowledge, this study represents the first reported use of quantitative ultrasonic characterization of skeletal muscle in mdx mice. Successful differentiation among dystrophic, steroid-treated, and normal tissues suggests the potential for local noninvasive monitoring of disease severity and therapeutic effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2291-2299
Number of pages9
JournalIEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control
Volume54
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2007

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Sensitive ultrasonic delineation of steroid treatment in living dystrophic mice with energy-based and entropy-based radio frequency signal processing'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this