Self-report by elderly breast cancer patients was an acceptable alternative to surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) abstract data

Mario Schootman, Donna B. Jeffe, Michele M. West, Rebecca Aft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare breast cancer patients' self-report and surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) abstract data regarding type of treatment received (radiation, chemotherapy, and hormonal therapies). Methods and Design: Patients 65 years of age or older diagnosed during 1999-2001 with stage I-II breast cancer and treated with conserving surgery were identified from the Iowa SEER registry; 307 (41% of those eligible) completed telephone interviews. SEER-registry abstract data also were obtained. Results: Agreement between self-reports and SEER data varied by type of treatment, with almost perfect agreement for chemotherapy (kappa = 0.93) and moderate to substantial agreement for ever use of hormonal therapy (kappa = 0.61), receipt of radiation therapy (kappa = 0.60), and current use of hormonal therapy (kappa = 0.54). If the SEER data are assumed to be the "gold standard," the sensitivity was generally high (>87%) for all types of treatment. Specificity varied according to type of treatment: highest for chemotherapy (98.4%) and lowest for radiation therapy (49.0%). Predictive values positive and negative were above 75% across type of treatment. Conclusion: Using self-reported data was an acceptable alternative to reviewing medical records for documenting some types of breast cancer treatment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1316-1319
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Clinical Epidemiology
Volume58
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Keywords

  • Accuracy
  • Breast cancer
  • Elderly
  • Kappa
  • Treatment

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Self-report by elderly breast cancer patients was an acceptable alternative to surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) abstract data'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this