Screening for vitamin d deficiency in black americans: Comparison of total, free, bioavailable 25 hydroxy vitamin d levels with parathyroid hormone levels and bone mineral density

Alexis McKee, S. M.Lima Ribeiro, T. K. Malmstrom, H. M. Perry, D. K. Miller, S. S. Farr, M. L. Niehoff, S. G. Albert

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    4 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Objectives: There is debate surrounding the adequacy of total and free 25 hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] levels in black Americans who have inherently high bone mineral density [BMD] and low serum concentration of vitamin D binding proteins [VDBP]. Design: Retrospective analysis of serum samples and BMD analyses from the African American Health Study [AAHS] cohort. Setting: The AAHS is a population-based longitudinal study initiated to examine issues of disability and frailty among urban-dwelling black Americans in the city of Saint Louis, Missouri. Participants: 122 men and 206 women, age 60.2 ± 4.3 years. Intervention: Retrospective analysis. Measurements: Total 25(OH)D, VDBP, PTH, and BMD of the lumbar spine and hip by dual energy x-ray photometry (DXA). Free and bioavailable vitamin D levels were calculated using serum concentrations and affinity constants for the VDBP (Gc1F and Gc1S) phenotypes. Results: Serum total 25(OH) D levels were 14.6 ± 8.9 ng/mL (36 ± 22 nmol/L). Vitamin D insufficiency was estimated by compensatory elevations of PTH above the normal range (> 65 pg/mL). PTH levels were within the normal reference range in > 95% of the samples at total 25(OH)D levels ≥ 20 ng/mL (≥50 nmol/L). There was no difference in the correlation of the reciprocal relationship of vitamin D vs parathyroid hormone between the VDBP phenotypes. Receiver operating characteristic curve analyses indicated that serum total 25(OH)D discriminated sufficiency from insufficiency at least as well as the calculated levels of the free and bioavailable vitamin D. Very low levels of total 25(OH)D (≤ 8 ng/mL, ≤20 nmol/L) were associated with decreased BMD (p=0.02), but higher levels of 25(OH)D did not show statistical differences in BMD. Conclusion: Total 25(OH)D levels of ≤ 8ng/mL (≤20 nmol/L) are associated with clinically significant changes in BMD, whereas total 25(OH)D levels ≥ 20 ng/mL (≥50 nmol/L) suppressed PTH and were not associated with deficiencies in BMD. Lower levels of 25(OH)D may be acceptable for bone health in black than in white Americans.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1045-1050
    Number of pages6
    JournalJournal of Nutrition, Health and Aging
    Volume22
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Nov 2018

    Keywords

    • Bioavailable vitamin D
    • Bone mineral density
    • Free vitamin D
    • Vitamin D binding proteins
    • Vitamin D deficiency

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