Screening and offering online programs for eating disorders: Reach, pathology, and differences across eating disorder status groups at 28 U.S. universities

Ellen E. Fitzsimmons-Craft, Katherine N. Balantekin, Dawn M. Eichen, Andrea K. Graham, Grace E. Monterubio, Shiri Sadeh-Sharvit, Neha J. Goel, Rachael E. Flatt, Kristina Saffran, Anna M. Karam, Marie Laure Firebaugh, Mickey Trockel, C. Barr Taylor, Denise E. Wilfley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The Internet-based Healthy Body Image (HBI) Program, which uses online screening to identify individuals at low risk of, high risk of, or with an eating disorder (ED) and then directs users to tailored, evidence-based online or in-person interventions to address individuals' risk or clinical status, was deployed at 28 U.S. universities as part of a randomized controlled trial. The purpose of this study is to report on: (a) reach of HBI, (b) screen results, and (c) differences across ED status groups. Method: All students on participating campuses ages 18 years or older were eligible, although recruitment primarily targeted undergraduate females. Results: The screen was completed 4,894 times, with an average of 1.9% of the undergraduate female student body on each campus taking the screen. ED risk in participating students was high—nearly 60% of students screened were identified as being at high risk for ED onset or having an ED. Key differences emerged across ED status groups on demographics, recruitment method, ED pathology, psychiatric comorbidity, and ED risk factors, highlighting increasing pathology and impairment in the high-risk group. Discussion: Findings suggest efforts are needed to increase reach of programs like HBI. Results also highlight the increasing pathology and impairment in the high-risk group and the importance of programs such as HBI, which provide access to timely screening and intervention to prevent onset of clinical EDs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1125-1136
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume52
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Keywords

  • college students
  • digital technologies
  • eating disorders
  • guided self-help
  • prevention
  • screening

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Screening and offering online programs for eating disorders: Reach, pathology, and differences across eating disorder status groups at 28 U.S. universities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this