Resveratrol supplementation does not improve metabolic function in nonobese women with normal glucose tolerance

Jun Yoshino, Caterina Conte, Luigi Fontana, Bettina Mittendorfer, Shin Ichiro Imai, Kenneth B. Schechtman, Charles Gu, Iris Kunz, Filippo Rossi Fanelli, Bruce W. Patterson, Samuel Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

254 Scopus citations

Abstract

Resveratrol has been reported to improve metabolic function in metabolically abnormal rodents and humans, but it has not been studied in nonobese people with normal glucose tolerance. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the metabolic effects of 12 weeks of resveratrol supplementation (75 mg/day) in nonobese, postmenopausal women with normal glucose tolerance. Although resveratrol supplementation increased plasma resveratrol concentration, it did not change body composition, resting metabolic rate, plasma lipids, or inflammatory markers. A two-stage hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure, in conjunction with stable isotopically labeled tracer infusions, demonstrated that resveratrol did not increase liver, skeletal muscle, or adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. Consistent with the absence of in vivo metabolic effects, resveratrol did not affect its putative molecular targets, including AMPK, SIRT1, NAMPT, and PPARGC1A, in either skeletal muscle or adipose tissue. These findings demonstrate that resveratrol supplementation does not have beneficial metabolic effects in nonobese, postmenopausal women with normal glucose tolerance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)658-664
Number of pages7
JournalCell metabolism
Volume16
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 7 2012

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Resveratrol supplementation does not improve metabolic function in nonobese women with normal glucose tolerance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this