Resilience among racially diverse adolescent patients with chronic orthopedic conditions

Robin Miyamoto, Craig Ono, Kalani Faustina, Kristiann Miyamoto, Paulette Nakamatsu, Daphne Lew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The theoretical literature on resilience shows there is no consensus regarding whether resilience is an ability; interactive process involving the individual, group, and community; both ability and process; or favorable outcome. A definitive part of the research on children’s resilience featured the assessment of an indicator of resilience (e.g., health-related quality of life) and involved pediatric patients with prolonged illnesses. The present study examined resilience directly as an ability and process, and related protective or risk variables, with validated instruments among adolescent patients with chronic orthopedic conditions. One-hundred fifteen adolescent patients assented (parents/legally authorized representatives consented), with 73 completing the study questionnaire. Fifteen, 47, and 10 scored low, normal, or high, respectively, on resilience-ability (one with missing data). These three groups differed significantly on the number of years living with family, individual personal skills, self-esteem, negative affect, anxiety, and depression. Resilience-ability positively correlated with number of years living with family, individual personal skills, and self-esteem, but negatively with duration of chronic orthopedic condition, negative affect, anxiety, and depression. Duration of chronic orthopedic condition negatively correlated with individual peer support among those scoring high on resilience-ability. For girls, duration of chronic orthopedic condition negatively correlated with resilience-ability, educational context, and self-esteem, but positively correlated with caregiver physical and psychological caregiving for boys. Findings underscored the consequence of resilience for these adolescent patients, with their chronic orthopedic conditions affecting daily function and life quality. Implementation of best practices to nurture and enhance their health-related resilience will promote a lifetime of well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4549-4566
Number of pages18
JournalCurrent Psychology
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2024

Keywords

  • Adolescent patients
  • Chronic orthopedic condition
  • Resilience
  • Resilient

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