Report from the 2018 consensus conference on immunomodulating agents in thoracic transplantation: Access, formulations, generics, therapeutic drug monitoring, and special populations

Adam B. Cochrane, Haifa Lyster, Jo Ann Lindenfeld, Christina Doligalski, David Baran, Colleen Yost, Michael Shullo, Martin Schweiger, David Weill, Linda Stuckey, Steven Ivulich, Janet Scheel, Lisa Peters, Monica Colvin, Kyle Dawson, Reda Girgis, Phillip Weeks, Tracy Tse, Stuart Russell, Maureen FlatteryDoug Jennings, Michelle Kittleson, Tara Miller, Tam Khuu, Tamara Claridge, Patricia Uber, Katrina Ford, Christopher R. Ensor, Kathleen Simpson, Anne Dipchand, Robert L. Page

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorial

Abstract

In 2009, the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation recognized the importance and challenges surrounding generic drug immunosuppression. As experience with generics has expanded and comfort has increased, substantial issues have arisen since that time with other aspects of immunomodulation that have not been addressed, such as access to medicines, alternative immunosuppression formulations, additional generics, implications on therapeutic drug monitoring, and implications for special populations such as pediatrics and older adults. The aim of this consensus document is to address critically each of these concerns, expand on the challenges and barriers, and provide therapeutic considerations for practitioners who manage patients who need to undergo or have undergone cardiothoracic transplantation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1050-1069
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
Volume39
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • generic immunosuppression
  • heart transplantation
  • immunosuppression
  • lung transplantation
  • pediatric transplantation

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