Relationship of weight, body dissatisfaction, and self-esteem in african american and white female dieters

Melissa B. Caldwell, Kelly D. Brownell, Denise E. Wilfley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

102 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The present study examined the relationship among weight, body dissatisfaction, and self-esteem in a large group of African American and white female dieters who were generally overweight and of middle to high socioeconomic status. Method: Subjects were participants in a survey of dieting practices undertaken by Consumer Reports magazine. Major outcome measures included the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and an assessment of shape and weight attitudes. Results: No significant differences between African American and white women were found for body dissatisfaction, self-esteem, discrepancies between actual and ideal weight and shape, or the relationship between self-esteem and body dissatisfaction. Body mass index contributed less to body satisfaction scores in African American than in white women. Discussion: This study provides a comparison of African American and white women in the upper social classes, and raises the possibility that previous findings of less body concern in African American women reflect class rather than race effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-130
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Eating Disorders
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 19 1997

Keywords

  • African American women
  • Upper social classes
  • White women

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