Recruitment of African American and Non-Hispanic White Older Adults for Alzheimer Disease Research Via Traditional and Social Media: a Case Study

Sarah H. Stout, Ganesh M. Babulal, Ann M. Johnson, Monique M. Williams, Catherine M. Roe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The increasing prevalence of Alzheimer disease (AD), higher risk among certain ethnoracial groups, and lack of effective therapies highlights the need to recruit and enroll diverse populations in prospective, observational studies and clinical trials. However, there is little known about the effectiveness of traditional media vs. social media outreach on recruitment in aging study studies. This study retrospectively examined the effectiveness and differences in using both traditional and social media materials for the recruitment of African American (AA) versus non-Hispanic white (NHW) participants for a prospective, longitudinal study examining preclinical AD and driving outcomes. Participants needed to be at least 65 years old, drive at least an average of once weekly, own a vehicle that was manufactured in 1996 or later, and agree to cognitive testing, psychometric testing, brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), brain amyloid positron emission tomography (PET), and cerebrospinal fluid collection via lumbar puncture. A total of 546 individuals contacted the study coordinator by phone or email. Of those individuals, 97 enrolled and 192 were not contacted secondary to filling enrollment capacity. Sixteen participants (16.5%) were AA and the remainder were NHW. Of the 354 individuals whom the coordinator contacted back, approximately 73% declined or did not return calls. Social media was more effective with recruiting NHW participants, while traditional advertisement (newspaper) was more successful in recruiting AA participants in this urban setting. Prospective studies should balance participant burden and enrollment with a targeted, multi-tiered recruitment plan and sufficient budget to reach the population of interest.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)329-339
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2020
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Recruitment of African American and Non-Hispanic White Older Adults for Alzheimer Disease Research Via Traditional and Social Media: a Case Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this