Rationale, design, and methods for a pivotal randomized clinical trial for the assessment of a cardiac support device in patients with New York health association class III-IV heart failure

Douglas L. Mann, Michael A. Acker, Mariell Jessup, Hani N. Sabbah, Randall C. Starling, Spencer H. Kubo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Heart failure remains a progressive disease with incremental morbidity and mortality despite optimal medical therapy. A growing body of evidence suggests that progressive left ventricular (LV) remodeling is directly related to a deterioration in LV performance and untoward clinical outcomes for heart failure patients. Preclinical and early phase I clinical studies with the CorCap Cardiac Support Device (CSD), a passive cardiac support device that prevents cardiac remodeling, have shown that it is safe and is associated with improvements in LV structure and function, as well as patient symptomatology. Methods and results The Acorn Pivotal Trial is a pivotal prospective, randomized, evaluation of the CorCap CSD in patients with New York Heart Association class III-IV heart failure. Patients will be enrolled into one of two different strata. Patients who require a mitral valve repair/replacement (MVR) will fall into the "MVR stratum" and will be randomized to either treatment (MVR surgery plus the CSD) or control (MVR surgery alone). Patients who do not have a clinical indication for MVR surgery will fall into the "no-MVR stratum" and will also be randomized to either treatment (CSD implant plus optimal medical therapy) or control (optimal medical therapy alone). A total of 300 patients (150 treatment and 150 control) will be enrolled. The primary endpoint of the trial is the change in clinical status from baseline to the end of the efficacy phase (1 year), as determined by a clinical composite score. Patients will be classified as improved, worsened, or unchanged based upon patient vital status, the occurrence of a major cardiac procedure indicative of heart failure progression, and a change in the assessment of New York Heart Association functional class. Conclusions The Acorn Pivotal Trial will formally test the hypothesis that preventing LV remodeling using a passive cardiac support device will favorably impact the untoward natural history of heart failure and thus represents an important departure from all previous medical and device studies that have been reported to date.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)185-192
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of cardiac failure
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2004

Keywords

  • LV remodeling
  • clinical trial
  • passive cardiac support device

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