Randomized clinical trial investigating the effect of consistent, developmentally-appropriate, and evidence-based multisensory exposures in the NICU

Bobbi Pineda, Joan Smith, Jessica Roussin, Michael Wallendorf, Polly Kellner, Graham Colditz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Evaluate the effect of a manualized multisensory program, applied across NICU hospitalization, on infant and parent outcomes. Study design: Seventy parent-infant dyads (born ≤32 weeks gestation) in a Level IV NICU were randomized at birth to the multisensory program or standard-of-care. Parents in the multisensory group administered prespecified amounts of age-appropriate, evidence-based sensory interventions to their infants each day during NICU hospitalization according to the Supporting and Enhancing NICU Sensory Experiences (SENSE) program. Results: Infants who received the SENSE program had more lethargy on the NICU Network Neurobehavioral Scale (NNNS) (p = 0.05), even after controlling for medical and social risk (p = 0.043), and had higher Communication scores on the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (p = 0.04) at 1-year corrected age, but this relationship failed to reach significance after controlling for medical and social risk (p = 0.12). Conclusion: The SENSE program shows promise for improving outcomes, but more research with larger sample sizes is needed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2449-2462
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume41
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

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