Radiographic results of arthrodesis with cotrel-dubousset instrumentation for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A five to ten-year follow-up study

Lawrence G. Lenke, Keith H. Bridwell, Kathy Blanke, Christy Baldus, Joetta Weston

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

85 Scopus citations

Abstract

We evaluated the radiographic results of posterior spinal arthrodesis with use of CotrelDubousset instrumentation in seventy-six patients who had adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. At an average of six years (range, five to ten years) postoperatively, the fusion appeared to be solid in all patients. Comparison of radiographs that had been made immediately postoperatively with those that had been made at the time of the latest follow-up showed that no patient had lost any correction in the coronal plane at the levels with instrumentation and seventy-five had had no change in the thoracic or lumbar sagittal alignment at the levels with or without instrumentation. In the remaining patient, a kyphosis had developed at the junction of the segments with instrumentation and those without instrumentation, necessitating additional operative treatment. Sixty-three patients completed a questionnaire for assessment of the clinical status. Their responses were favorable with regard to function, cosmetic appearance, and general satisfaction with the operative result. Twenty-four (38 per cent) of the sixty-three patients reported occasional pain in the spine that did not interfere with work or school activities. Sixty-two patients stated that, given the hypothetical situation of reverting to the preoperative status, they would have the operation again.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)807-814
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A
Volume80
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jun 1 1998

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Radiographic results of arthrodesis with cotrel-dubousset instrumentation for the treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: A five to ten-year follow-up study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this