Racial, ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in patients undergoing transcatheter mitral edge-to-edge repair

Robert T. Sparrow, Shubrandu S. Sanjoy, Brian R. Lindman, Gilbert H.L. Tang, Tsuyoshi Kaneko, Jason H. Wasfy, Ashish Pershad, Pedro A. Villablanca, Mayra Guerrero, M. Chadi Alraies, Yun Hee Choi, Luciano A. Sposato, Mamas A. Mamas, Rodrigo Bagur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Transcatheter mitral edge-to-edge repair (TEER) is an increasingly common procedure performed on patients with severe mitral regurgitation. This study assessed the impact of race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status on in-hospital complications after TEER. Methods: Cohort-based observational study using the National Inpatient Sample between October 2013 and December 2018. The population was stratified into 4 groups based on race/ethnicity and quartiles of neighborhood income levels. The primary outcome was in-hospital complications, defined as the composite of death, bleeding, cardiac and vascular complications, acute kidney injury, and ischemic stroke. Results: 3795 hospitalizations for TEER were identified. Patients of Black and Hispanic race/ethnicity comprised 7.4% and 6.4%, respectively. We estimated that White patients received TEER with a frequency of 38.0/100,000, compared to 29.7/100,000 for Blacks and 30.5/100,000 for Hispanics. In-hospital complications occurred in 20.2% of patients and no differences were found between racial/ethnic groups (P = 0.06). After multilevel modelling, Black and Hispanic patients had similar rate of overall in-hospital complications (OR: 0.84, CI:0.67–1.05 and OR: 0.84, CI:0.66–1.07, respectively) as compared to White patients, however, higher rates of death were observed in Black patients. Individuals living in income quartile-1 had worse in-hospital outcomes as compared to quartile-4 (OR: 1.19, CI:0.99–1.42). Conclusion: In this study assessing racial/ethnic disparities in TEER outcomes, aged-adjusted race/ethnicity minorities were less underrepresented as compared to other structural heart interventions. Black patients experienced a higher rate of in-hospital death, but similar overall rate of post-procedural adverse events as compared to White patients. Lower income levels appear to negatively impact on in-hospital outcomes. Brief summary: This study appraises race/ethnic and socioeconomical disparities in access and outcomes following transcatheter mitral edge-to-edge repair. Racial minority groups were less underrepresented as compared to other structural heart interventions. While Black patients experienced a higher rate of in-hospital death, they experienced similar overall rate of post-procedural complications compared to White patients. Lower income levels also appeared to negatively impact on outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-81
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume344
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2021

Keywords

  • Mitral valve regurgitation
  • Racial disparities
  • Socioeconomic inequality
  • Transcatheter mitral valve repair

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