Quasi-periodic patterns contribute to functional connectivity in the brain

Anzar Abbas, Michaël Belloy, Amrit Kashyap, Jacob Billings, Maysam Nezafati, Eric H. Schumacher, Shella Keilholz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Functional connectivity is widely used to study the coordination of activity between brain regions over time. Functional connectivity in the default mode and task positive networks is particularly important for normal brain function. However, the processes that give rise to functional connectivity in the brain are not fully understood. It has been postulated that low-frequency neural activity plays a key role in establishing the functional architecture of the brain. Quasi-periodic patterns (QPPs) are a reliably observable form of low-frequency neural activity that involve the default mode and task positive networks. Here, QPPs from resting-state and working memory task-performing individuals were acquired. The spatiotemporal pattern, strength, and frequency of the QPPs between the two groups were compared and the contribution of QPPs to functional connectivity in the brain was measured. In task-performing individuals, the spatiotemporal pattern of the QPP changes, particularly in task-relevant regions, and the QPP tends to occur with greater strength and frequency. Differences in the QPPs between the two groups could partially account for the variance in functional connectivity between resting-state and task-performing individuals. The QPPs contribute strongly to connectivity in the default mode and task positive networks and to the strength of anti-correlation seen between the two networks. Many of the connections affected by QPPs are also disrupted during several neurological disorders. These findings contribute to understanding the dynamic neural processes that give rise to functional connectivity in the brain and how they may be disrupted during disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)193-204
Number of pages12
JournalNeuroImage
Volume191
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Keywords

  • Default mode network
  • Functional connectivity
  • Quasi-periodic patterns
  • Resting state
  • Task
  • Task positive network

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