Quantitative measures reflect degeneration, but not regeneration, in the deafness mouse organ of Corti

Brian T. Faddis, Ruth M. Hughes, James D. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The deafness mouse (dnldn) is a well known model of hereditary deafness uncomplicated by behavioral and motor disturb. The organ of Corti in this mouse develops a normal complement of sensory and supporting cell structures, yet animals homozygous for this gene never demonstrate any hearing capacity. They are profoundly deaf from birth. Soon after development, the organ Corti rapidly degenerates, most sensory cells having vanished by 50 days of age. Published observations have suggested that regions of the organ of Corti may regenerate some supporting cell structures by 90 days of age. We have quantified changes in of Corti structure from 15 to 130 days of age using several different measures. Measures of peak height and total cross-sectional are as well as a subjective rating scale, all demonstrate consistent degenerative changes during this time period. No evidence for regeneration of supporting or sensory cell structures is noted, although a surprising degree of variability is present in all regions the organ of Corti which may account for previous claims.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-12
Number of pages7
JournalHearing research
Volume115
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

Keywords

  • Deafness mouse
  • Degeneration
  • Organ of Corti
  • Regeneration

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