Prospective evaluation of serum sarcosine and risk of prostate cancer in the prostate, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer screening trial

Stella Koutros, Tamra E. Meyer, Stephen D. Fox, Haleem J. Issaq, Timothy D. Veenstra, Wen Yi Huang, Kai Yu, Demetrius Albanes, Lisa W. Chu, Gerald Andriole, Robert N. Hoover, Ann W. Hsing, Sonja I. Berndt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Metabolomic profiling has identified, sarcosine, a derivative of the amino acid glycine, as an important metabolite involved in the etiology or natural history of prostate cancer. We examined the association between serum sarcosine levels and risk of prostate cancer in 1122 cases (813 non-aggressive and 309 aggressive) and 1112 controls in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Sarcosine was quantified using high-throughput liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A significantly increased risk of prostate cancer was observed with increasing levels of sarcosine (odds ratio [OR] for the highest quartile of exposure [Q4] versus the lowest quartile [Q1] = 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02, 1.65; P-trend 0.03). When stratified by disease aggressiveness, we observed a stronger association for non-aggressive cases (OR for Q4 versus Q1 = 1.44, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.88; P-trend 0.006) but no association for aggressive prostate cancer (OR for Q4 versus Q1 = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.73, 1.47; P-trend 0.89). Although not statistically significant, temporal analyses showed a stronger association between sarcosine and prostate cancer for serum collected closer to diagnosis, suggesting that sarcosine may be an early biomarker of disease. Interestingly, the association between sarcosine and prostate cancer risk was stronger among men with diabetes (OR = 2.66, 95% CI: 1.04, 6.84) compared with those without reported diabetes (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 0.95-1.59, P-interaction = 0.01). This study found that elevated levels of serum sarcosine are associated with an increased prostate cancer risk and evidence to suggest that sarcosine may be an early biomarker for this disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2281-2285
Number of pages5
JournalCarcinogenesis
Volume34
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013

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