Proprioception following total knee arthroplasty with and without the posterior cruciate ligament

Scott Simmons, Scott Lephart, Harry Rubash, Paul Borsa, Robert L. Barrack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Proprioception was measured in two groups of patients following successful total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In one group, the posterior cruciate ligament was retained and an unconstrained cruciate-retaining total knee component was used; in the other group, the posterior cruciate ligament was excised and a cruciate-substituting design was implanted. Threshold to detection of passive motion was quantified as a measure of proprioception. The degree of preoperative arthritis was objectively classified according to Resnick and Niwoyama. There was no difference in threshold to detection of passive motion in cruciate-retaining versus cruciate-substituting TKA. In patients with a moderate grade of arthritis before surgery, the postoperative scores were virtually identical. When the grade of preoperative arthritis was severe, patients with cruciate-substituting TKAs performed significantly better than those with cruciate-retaining TKAs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)763-768
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Arthroplasty
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

Keywords

  • posterior cruciate ligament
  • proprioception
  • threshold to detection of passive motion
  • total knee arthroplasty

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