Prevalence and patterns of gestational parent’s own milk feeds among infants with major congenital surgical anomalies in the NICU

Jill R. Demirci, Jessica Davis, Melissa Glasser, Beverly Brozanski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To describe the prevalence and patterns of gestational parent’s own milk (GPOM) feedings among infants undergoing major surgery during their neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission. Study Design: We analyzed de-identified electronic medical records of all infants admitted to a regional NICU 2014–2015 who underwent surgery for a gastrointestinal, cardiac, or other major organ system defect(s). Results: Of 79 infants, 85% received any GPOM during the NICU hospitalization. The median proportion of GPOM feeds was 66%. There was a trend toward decreassing proportions of GPOM with progressive months in NICU. The rate of any and exclusive GPOM feeds at NICU discharge was 49% and 29%, respectively. Infants who had a GI anomaly were more likely than infants with a cardiac anomaly to be discharged from NICU receiving GPOM. Conclusion: Barriers to the exclusive and continued provision of GPOM in this population require further study and intervention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2782-2788
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume41
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2021

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