Preserving independence among under-resourced older adults in the Southeastern United States: existing barriers and potential strategies for research

Ene M. Enogela, Taylor Buchanan, Christy S. Carter, Ronit Elk, Shena B. Gazaway, Burel R. Goodin, Elizabeth A. Jackson, Raymond Jones, Richard E. Kennedy, Emma Perez-Costas, Lisa Zubkoff, Emily L. Zumbro, Alayne D. Markland, Thomas W. Buford

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Disability prevention and preservation of independence is crucial for successful aging of older adults. To date, relatively little is known regarding disparities in independent aging in a disadvantaged older adult population despite widely recognized health disparities reported in other populations and disciplines. In the U.S., the Southeastern region also known as “the Deep South”, is an economically and culturally unique region ravaged by pervasive health disparities – thus it is critical to evaluate barriers to independent aging in this region along with strategies to overcome these barriers. The objective of this narrative review is to highlight unique barriers to independent aging in the Deep South and to acknowledge gaps and potential strategies and opportunities to fill these gaps. We have synthesized findings of literature retrieved from searches of computerized databases and authoritative texts. Ultimately, this review aims to facilitate discussion and future research that will help to address the unique challenges to the preservation of independence among older adults in the Deep South region.

Original languageEnglish
Article number119
JournalInternational Journal for Equity in Health
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Disability
  • Health disparities
  • Independence
  • Southeastern United states

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