Presentation and stage-specific outcomes of lifelong never-smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

Janakiraman Subramanian, Vamsidhar Velcheti, Feng Gao, Ramaswamy Govindan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Tobacco smoking leads to lung cancer. Approximately 10% of patients with lung cancer are life long never-smokers. There are only limited data available on the clinical characteristics and outcomes of lung cancer in never-smokers from the Western hemisphere. METHODS: Demographic and survival information was collected on 254 never-smokers with a confirmed pathologic diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by reviewing their medical records and the Social Security database. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 182 (71.6%) women and 72 (28.3%) men. The median age was 70 years (range: 31-91 years). Adenocarcinoma was the most common histology accounting for 60.8% of all patients, followed by NSCLC not otherwise specified (14.4%), bronchoalveolar carcinoma (13.6%), squamous cell carcinoma (8.8%), and large-cell type (2.4%). Majority of patients presented with stage III or IV disease (62.5%). We compared survival between never-smokers and smokers with NSCLC matched for gender, histology, tumor stage, and years of diagnosis. No significant difference in 5-year survival was seen between never-smokers (27.2%) and smokers with NSCLC (31.3%; p = 0.73). CONCLUSIONS: Two thirds of patients with lung cancer who report no history of tobacco smoking are women. In the matched case-control analysis, we report no significant survival difference between lung cancer in never-smokers and those with history of tobacco smoking and lung cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)827-830
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Thoracic Oncology
Volume2
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

Keywords

  • Never-smoker
  • Non-small cell lung cancer
  • Outcomes
  • Presentation

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