Preeclampsia at term: evidence of disease heterogeneity based on the profile of circulating cytokines and angiogenic factors

Tinnakorn Chaiworapongsa, Roberto Romero, Nardhy Gomez-Lopez, Manaphat Suksai, Dahiana M. Gallo, Eunjung Jung, Stanley M. Berry, Awoniyi Awonuga, Adi L. Tarca, David R. Bryant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Intravascular inflammation and an antiangiogenic state have been implicated in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. On the basis of the profiles of their angiogenic/antiangiogenic factors, women with preeclampsia at term may be classified into 2 subgroups with different characteristics and prevalence of adverse outcomes. This study was undertaken to examine whether these 2 subgroups of preeclampsia at term also show differences in their profiles of intravascular inflammation. Objective: This study aimed to determine the plasma profiles of cytokines and chemokines in women with preeclampsia at term who had a normal or an abnormal angiogenic profile. Study Design: A nested case–control study was conducted to include women classified into 3 groups: women with an uncomplicated pregnancy (n=213) and women with preeclampsia at term with a normal (n=55) or an abnormal (n=41) angiogenic profile. An abnormal angiogenic profile was defined as a plasma ratio of placental growth factor and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 multiple of the median <10th percentile for gestational age. Concentrations of cytokines were measured by multiplex immunoassays. Results: Women with preeclampsia at term and an abnormal angiogenic profile showed evidence of the greatest intravascular inflammation among the study groups. These women had higher plasma concentrations of 5 cytokines (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-12/interleukin-23p40, interleukin-15, and interleukin-16) and 7 chemokines (eotaxin, eotaxin-3, interferon-γ inducible protein-10, monocyte chemotactic protein-4, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, macrophage-derived chemokine, and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine compared to women with an uncomplicated pregnancy. By contrast, women with preeclampsia at term and a normal angiogenic profile, compared to women with an uncomplicated pregnancy, had only a higher plasma concentration of monocyte chemotactic protein-4. A correlation between severity of the antiangiogenic state, blood pressure, and plasma concentrations of a subset of cytokines was observed. Conclusion: Term preeclampsia can be classified into 2 clusters. One is characterized by an antiangiogenic state coupled with an excessive inflammatory process, whereas the other has neither of these features. These findings further support the heterogeneity of preeclampsia at term and may explain the distinct clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)450.e1-450.e18
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume230
Issue number4
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023

Keywords

  • adverse perinatal outcome
  • antiangiogenic factor
  • eclampsia
  • elevated liver enzymes and low platelet (HELLP) syndrome
  • future cardiovascular disease
  • hemolysis
  • hypertensive disease in pregnancy
  • imbalance of angiogenic factors
  • maternal morbidity
  • multiplex
  • placental growth factor (PlGF)
  • soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1)
  • subclassification
  • subtype

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Preeclampsia at term: evidence of disease heterogeneity based on the profile of circulating cytokines and angiogenic factors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this