Predictive ability of 2-day measurement of active range of motion on 3-mo upper-extremity motor function in people with poststroke hemiparesis

Eliza M. Prager, Catherine E. Lang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We determined (1) whether active range of motion (AROM) of shoulder flexion and wrist extension measured at the initial therapy evaluation in the acute hospital predicted upper-extremity (UE) motor function 3 mo after stroke and (2) whether the presence of nonmotor impairments influenced this prediction. METHOD: We collected AROM data from 50 people with stroke during their initial acute hospital therapy evaluation and UE motor function data 3 mo later. Multiple regression techniques determined the predictive ability of initial AROM on later UE motor function. RESULTS: Initial AROM explained 28% of the variance in UE motor function 3 mo poststroke. Nonmotor deficits did not contribute to the variance. CONCLUSION: Compared with later AROM measurements, initial values did not adequately predict UE motor function 3 mo after stroke. Clinicians should use caution when informing clients of UE functional prognosis in the early days after stroke.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-41
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Occupational Therapy
Volume66
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Keywords

  • Motor skills
  • Paresis
  • Predictive value of tests
  • Range of motion articular
  • Stroke
  • Upper extremity

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