Predicting difficulties controlling overeating and drinking when experiencing negative affect in undergraduate women

Anna M. Bardone-Cone, Lisa M. Brownstone, M. K. Higgins, Megan B. Harney, Ellen E. Fitzsimmons-Craft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Negative affect has been associated with both binge eating and problem drinking; thus, a better understanding of factors related to difficulties controlling overeating and drinking when experiencing negative affect is warranted. in this study, we examined interactive models of perfectionism and stress as predictors of difficulties controlling overeating and drinking when experiencing negative affect, using two dimensions of perfectionism, self-oriented and socially prescribed, and three domains of stress: academic, interpersonal, and weight/shape. A sample of 406 undergraduate females participated in a brief longitudinal study by completing surveys assessing perfectionism (Time 1), stress (weekly between Times 1 and 2), and the degree of difficulty controlling overeating and drinking when experiencing negative affect (Time 2). Socially prescribed perfectionism interacted with academic stress to predict difficulty controlling overeating when experiencing negative affect. Socially prescribed perfectionism also interacted with each domain of stress in the prediction of difficulty controlling drinking when experiencing negative affect. No significant 2-way interactions emerged involving self-oriented perfectionism. These interactive findings have clinical implications, suggesting avenues of prevention and intervention with a focus on socially prescribed perfectionism and academic stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1051-1073
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Social and Clinical Psychology
Volume31
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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