Pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV prevention preferences among young adult African American men who have sex with men

Rupa R. Patel, John S. Crane, Julia López, Philip A. Chan, Albert Y. Liu, Rubabin Tooba, Aimee S. James

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is effective in preventing HIV infections among men who have sex with men (MSM). PrEP uptake and adherence remain low and product preferences are unknown, especially among young African American MSM who are most at-risk. We conducted 26 qualitative interviews from 2014-2016 among young adult HIV-negative African American MSM regarding PrEP product preferences in Missouri. While the pill and injectable were most liked of all modalities, about a quarter preferred rectal products or patches. Most participants preferred a long-acting injectable (LAI) to daily oral pills due to better medication adherence and a dislike for taking pills. Many participants preferred daily oral pills to on-demand oral PrEP due to the inability to predict sex and the perception that insufficient time or medication would not achieve HIV protection with on-demand. A fear of needles and the perception that there would not be therapeutic levels for a long duration were concerns with injectable PrEP. Study findings highlight the need for a range of prevention options for African American MSM and can inform PrEP product development as well as dissemination and implementation efforts.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0209484
JournalPloS one
Volume13
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2018

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