Postreperfusion cardiac arrest and resuscitation during orthotopic liver transplantation: Dynamic visualization and analysis of physiologic recordings

Andrea Vannucci, Anton Burykin, Vladimir Krejci, Tyler Peck, Timothy G. Buchman, Ivan M. Kangrga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

We recently reported on the Multi Wave Animator (MWA), a novel open-source tool with capability of recreating continuous physiologic signals from archived numerical data and presenting them as they appeared on the patient monitor. In this report, we demonstrate for the first time the power of this technology in a real clinical case, an intraoperative cardiopulmonary arrest following reperfusion of a liver transplant graft. Using the MWA, we animated hemodynamic and ventilator data acquired before, during, and after cardiac arrest and resuscitation. This report is accompanied by an online video that shows the most critical phases of the cardiac arrest and resuscitation and provides a basis for analysis and discussion. This video is extracted from a 33-min, uninterrupted video of cardiac arrest and resuscitation, which is available online. The unique strength of MWA, its capability to accurately present discrete and continuous data in a format familiar to clinicians, allowed us this rare glimpse into events leading to an intraoperative cardiac arrest. Because of the ability to recreate and replay clinical events, this tool should be of great interest to medical educators, researchers, and clinicians involved in quality assurance and patient safety.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-38
Number of pages5
JournalShock
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Keywords

  • Cardiac arrest
  • dynamic visualization of physiologic signals
  • hyperkalemia
  • liver transplantation
  • patient monitoring

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