Pooled data analysis of laparoscopic vs. open ventral hernia repair: 14 years of patient data accrual

B. D. Matthews, R. A. Pierce, M. M. Frisella, L. M. Brunt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Incisional hernia is a common complication or consequence of abdominal surgery. In recent published series, the rate of incisional hernia after midline laparotomy has been as high as 20% [23, 26, 29, 33]. Due to recurrence rates as high as 30%, incisional hernias are not only associated with significant morbidity but may represent a significant financial strain on the healthcare system [10, 11]. Over the last decade, mesh-based repair techniques have replaced primary suture repair for most incisional hernia repairs because of an unacceptably high failure rate after primary repair [1, 6, 18, 19]. Nevertheless, open incisional hernia repair is often a major operation, with the associated risks of wound- and mesh-related infections and hernia recurrence. As an alternative approach, laparoscopic incisional hernia repair was developed and first reported in 1991 [16]. This technique is now increasingly used in the management of patients with uncomplicated as well as more complex incisional hernias.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHernia Repair Sequelae
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages331-343
Number of pages13
ISBN (Print)9783642045523
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

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    Matthews, B. D., Pierce, R. A., Frisella, M. M., & Brunt, L. M. (2010). Pooled data analysis of laparoscopic vs. open ventral hernia repair: 14 years of patient data accrual. In Hernia Repair Sequelae (pp. 331-343). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-11541-7_45