POEM is a cost-effective procedure: cost-utility analysis of endoscopic and surgical treatment options in the management of achalasia

Heidi J. Miller, Ruel Neupane, Mojtaba Fayezizadeh, Arnab Majumder, Jeffrey M. Marks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Achalasia is a rare motility disorder of the esophagus. Treatment is palliative with the goal of symptom remission and slowing the progression of the disease. Treatment options include per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LM) and endoscopic treatments such as pneumatic dilation (PD) and botulinum toxin type A injections (BI). We evaluate the economics and cost-effectiveness of treating achalasia. Methods: We performed cost analysis for POEM, LM, PD and BI at our institution from 2011 to 2015. Cost of LM was set to 1, and other procedures are presented as percentage change. Cost-effectiveness was calculated based on cost, number of interventions required for optimal results for dilations and injections and efficacy reported in the current literature. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated by a cost-utility analysis using quality-adjusted life year gained, defined as a symptom-free year in a patient with achalasia. Results: Average number of interventions required was 2.3 dilations or two injections for efficacies of 80 and 61 %, respectively. POEM cost 1.058 times the cost of LM, and PD and BI cost 0.559 and 0.448 times the cost of LM. Annual cost per cure over a period of 4 years for POEM, and LM were consistently equivalent, trending the same as PD although this has a lower initial cost. The cost per cure of BI remains stable over 3 years and then doubles. Conclusion: The cost-effectiveness of POEM and LM is equivalent. Myotomy, either surgical or endoscopic, is more cost-effective than BI due to high failure rates of the economical intervention. When treatment is being considered BI should be utilized in patients with less than 2-year life expectancy. Pneumatic dilations are cost-effective and are an acceptable approach to treatment of achalasia, although myotomy has a lower relapse rate and is cost-effective compared to PD after 2 years.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1636-1642
Number of pages7
JournalSurgical endoscopy
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Keywords

  • Achalasia
  • Cost-efficacy
  • Treatment

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'POEM is a cost-effective procedure: cost-utility analysis of endoscopic and surgical treatment options in the management of achalasia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this