Physician and family discussions about driving safety: Findings from the LoNGROAD study

on behalf of the LongROAD Research Team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Older adult drivers may experience decreases in driving safety with age or health status change. Discussing driving safety may help them plan for driving restriction and eventual cessation. Here, we sought to examine conversations between older adults and their family members and physicians. Methods: In this multi-site cross-sectional analysis of baseline data from the AAA Longitudinal Research on Aging Drivers (LongROAD) cohort study, we measured the prevalence and characteristics of family and physician driving discussions. We examined associations between having driving discussions and participant characteristics using multivariate logistic regression. Results: Of 2990 current drivers aged 65 to 79 years (53% female, 85.5% White), only 14.2% reported discussing driving safety with family and 5.5% had discussions with physicians. Men (adjusted OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.66) and those with Master’s degrees or higher (adjusted OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.27 to 2.13) more often had family discussions. Those with at least a Master’s degree were also more likely to speak with their physician (adjusted OR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.17 to 2.68). Conclusion: Few older adults had driving safety conversations with their family or physicians. Practical and effective interventions are needed to engage family and physicians in assisting older adults with risk assessment and driving cessation planning to maintain mobility and well-being.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)607-613
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Board of Family Medicine
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Automobile Driving
  • Cohort Studies
  • Communication
  • Cross-Sectional Studies
  • Logistic Models
  • Physician-Patient Relations
  • Risk Assessment

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