Phenotyping of Urinary Urgency Patients Without Urgency Incontinence, and Their Comparison to Urgency Incontinence Patients: Findings from the LURN Study

Symptoms of Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Research Network (LURN), H. Henry Lai, Jonathan B. Wiseman, Margaret E. Helmuth, Abigail R. Smith, Cindy L. Amundsen, Anne P. Cameron, Alexander P. Glaser, Whitney K. Hendrickson, Ziya Kirkali, Kimberly Kenton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

Purpose:We characterize patients with urinary urgency with vs without urgency urinary incontinence who presented to clinics actively seeking treatment for their symptoms.Materials and Methods:Participants who enrolled in the Symptoms of Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Research Network were categorized into urinary urgency with vs without urgency urinary incontinence. Participants were followed for 1 year; their urinary symptoms, urological pain, psychosocial factors, bowel function, sleep disturbance, physical activity levels, physical function, and quality of life were compared. Mixed effects linear regression models were used to examine the relationships between urgency urinary incontinence and these factors.Results:Among 683 participants with urinary urgency at baseline, two-thirds (n=453) also had urgency urinary incontinence; one-third (n=230) had urinary urgency-only without urgency urinary incontinence. No differences were detected in urological pain between urinary urgency-only and urgency urinary incontinence. Those with urgency urinary incontinence had more severe urgency and frequency symptoms, higher depression, anxiety, perceived stress scores, more severe bowel dysfunction and sleep disturbance, lower physical activity levels, lower physical function, and worse quality of life than those with urinary urgency-only. Among those with urinary urgency-only at baseline, 40% continued to have urinary urgency-only, 15% progressed to urgency urinary incontinence, and 45% had no urgency at 12 months. Fifty-eight percent with urgency urinary incontinence at baseline continued to report urgency urinary incontinence at 12 months, while 15% improved to urinary urgency-only, and 27% had no urgency.Conclusions:Patients with urgency urinary incontinence have severe storage symptoms, more psychosocial symptoms, poorer physical functioning, and worse quality of life. Our data suggested urgency urinary incontinence may be a more severe manifestation of urinary urgency, rather than urinary urgency and urgency urinary incontinence being distinct entities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)233-242
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume209
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2023

Keywords

  • lower urinary tract symptoms
  • overactive
  • urgency
  • urgency urinary incontinence
  • urinary bladder

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