Perspectives of Health Care Providers on US South Asians’ Attitudes Toward Pain Management at End of Life

Nidhi Khosla, Karla T. Washington, Hariharan Regunath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

A lack of research on pain management among seriously ill South Asians reveals a critical gap in the knowledge base regarding culturally responsive end-of-life care. This qualitative descriptive study investigated the perspectives of health care providers that have cared for seriously ill older South Asians, on the attitudes of US South Asians toward the management of pain experienced at end of life and the factors that influenced these attitudes. Thematic analysis of interviews and focus group discussions with 57 health care providers indicated that providers perceive South Asian patients and families to be generally reluctant to use medications to treat pain experienced at end of life. Detailed description of patient-related and culturally based reasons for this reluctance is provided along with implications for hospice and palliative care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)849-857
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Hospice and Palliative Medicine
Volume33
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Keywords

  • South Asians
  • cultural competency
  • hospices
  • pain management
  • palliative care
  • qualitative research
  • vulnerable populations

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