Perioperative outcomes of the Geriatric Assessment and Medical Preoperative Screening (GrAMPS) program pilot for older hernia patients: does chronological age predict outcomes?

Bradley S. Kushner, Timothy Holden, Britta J. Han, Julia Hamilton, Margaret Sehnert, Sara E. Holden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The Geriatric Assessment and Medical Preoperative Screening (GrAMPS) program was an initial attempt to understand and to define the prevalence of age-related risk factors in older patients undergoing elective ventral hernia repair (VHR) or inguinal hernia repair (IHR). Preliminary analysis found significant rates of previously unrecognized objective cognitive dysfunction, multimorbidity and polypharmacy. We now examine whether chronological age as a sole risk factor can predict a patient’s perioperative outcomes, and if traditional risk calculators that rely heavily on chronological age can accurately capture a patient’s true risk. Methods: This was a retrospective secondary analysis of the previously reported GrAMPS trial enrolling patients 60 years and older with a planned elective repair of a ventral or inguinal hernia. The rates of key postoperative outcomes were compared between various cohorts stratified by chronological age. Previously validated risk screening calculators [Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI), National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP)] were compared between cohorts. Results: In total, 55 (78.6%) of the 70 patients enrolled in GrAMPS underwent operative intervention by May 2021, including 26 VHR and 29 IHRs. Cohorts stratified by chronological age had similar rates of key perioperative wound and age-related outcomes including readmissions, postoperative complications, non-home discharges, and length of stay. Additionally, while the commonly used risk calculators, CCI and NSQIP, consistently predicted worse outcomes for older hernia patients (stratified by both median age and age-tertiles), screening positive on these risk assessments were not actually predictive of a greater incidence of postoperative complications. Conclusions: Chronological age does not accurately predict worse adverse postoperative complications in older hernia patients. Additionally, traditional risk screening calculators that rely heavily on age to risk stratify may not accurately capture a patient’s true surgical risk. Surgeons should continue to explore nuanced patient risk assessments that more accurately capture age-related risk factors to better individualize perioperative risk.

Original languageEnglish
JournalSurgical endoscopy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Age
  • Frailty
  • Geriatric syndromes
  • Inguinal hernia
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Ventral hernias

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Perioperative outcomes of the Geriatric Assessment and Medical Preoperative Screening (GrAMPS) program pilot for older hernia patients: does chronological age predict outcomes?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this