Pediatric secondary lens implantation in the absence of capsular support

K. David Epley, Marla T. Shainberg, Gregg T. Lueder, Lawrence Tychsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To describe and evaluate alternate techniques for implanting intraocular lenses in children in the absence of adequate capsular support for traditional lens implantation. Methods: Postoperative results of 18 eyes with posterior chamber intraocular lenses (PCIOLs) sutured to the ciliary sulcus and 10 eyes implanted with anterior chamber intraocular lenses (ACIOLs) were reviewed. Visual outcomes were divided into 2 groups: onset of aphakia during the critical period of visual development (≤9 years) and onset after the critical period (>9 years). Visual outcomes and complications were recorded. Results: Average follow-up was 10.3 months in the PCIOL group and 49.2 months in the ACIOL group. Eyes that became aphakic after the critical period of visual development achieved better overall final visual acuity than the eyes that became aphakic during the critical period; indeed, the eyes that became aphakic during the critical period did not achieve significantly improved vision. There were no complications in the PCIOL group. Complications in the ACIOL group included corectopia, haptic migration through the operative wound requiring removal, and pigment deposits on the lens. Conclusions: PCIOLs sutured to the ciliary sulcus offer a superior option to ACIOLs for correction of childhood aphakia in children lacking capsular support. ACIOLs had a high rate of serious complications (10%) in this small series. Secondary implantation with transsclerally sutured PCIOLs should be considered in complicated cases when more conservative options have been exhausted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-306
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of AAPOS
Volume5
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2001

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pediatric secondary lens implantation in the absence of capsular support'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this