Patterns of care in hilar node-positive (N1) non-small cell lung cancer: A missed treatment opportunity? Read at the 41st Annual Meeting of the Western Thoracic Surgical Association, Whistler, British Columbia, Canada, June 25, 2015.

Matthew J. Bott, Aalok P. Patel, Vivek Verma, Traves D. Crabtree, Daniel Morgensztern, Clifford G. Robinson, Graham A. Colditz, Saiama Waqar, Daniel Kreisel, A. Sasha Krupnick, G. Alexander Patterson, Stephen Broderick, Bryan F. Meyers, Varun Puri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background For patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) metastatic to hilar lymph nodes (N1), guidelines recommend surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy in operable patients and chemoradiation (CRT) for those deemed inoperable. It is unclear how these recommendations are applied nationally, however. Methods The National Cancer Database was queried to identify patients with a tumor <7 cm (T1/T2) with clinically positive N1 nodes. Patients undergoing CRT (comprising chemotherapy and radiation >45 Gy) or surgical resection were considered adequately treated. Remaining patients were classified as receiving inadequate or no treatment. Results Of the 20,366 patients who met the study criteria, 63% underwent adequate treatment (48% surgical resection, 15% CRT). The remainder received inadequate treatment (23%) or no treatment (14%). In univariate analysis, the patients receiving inadequate or no treatment were older, tended to be non-Caucasian, had a lower income, and had a higher comorbidity score. Patients undergoing adequate treatment had improved overall survival (OS) compared with those receiving inadequate or no treatment (median OS, 34.0 months vs 11.7 months; P <.001). Of those receiving adequate treatment, logistic regression identified several variables associated with surgical resection, including treatment at an academic facility, Caucasian race, and annual income >$35,000. Increasing age and T2 stage were associated with nonoperative management. Following propensity score matching of 2308 patient pairs undergoing surgery or CRT, resection was associated with longer median OS (34.1 months vs 22.0 months; P <.001). Conclusions Despite the established guidelines, many patients with T1-2N1 NSCLC do not receive adequate treatment. Surgery is associated with prolonged survival in selected patients. Surgical input in the multidisciplinary evaluation of these patients should be mandatory.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1549-1558.e2
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume151
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Keywords

  • locally advanced
  • lymph nodes
  • multi-modality therapy
  • non-small cell lung cancer
  • practice patterns
  • surgical resection

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