Patient Preferences for the Treatment of Shoulder and Proximal Biceps Disorders Are Associated With Patient Age, Race, Sex, and Activity Level

Matthew V. Smith, Michelle Gosselin, Karen Steger-May, Matthew J. Matava, Rick W. Wright, Robert H. Brophy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Patient preference information has become increasingly more important in clinical decision making. Purpose: To assess patient preferences when making treatment decisions in the shoulder to determine which features are more important according to patient age, race, activity level, and sex. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Study participants aged ≥18 years were surveyed as to their preferences regarding surgical treatment for shoulder and proximal biceps abnormalities. Survey features included time to return to unrestricted activities, time to return to work, size and appearance of scars, the potential for persistent pain in the upper arm or shoulder, fatigue in the biceps with repetitive lifting, potential for muscle cramping, and deformity in the proximal biceps. Participants also completed a validated shoulder activity scale, and demographic data regarding age, race, and sex were collected. Results: A total of 349 participants (166 female, 183 male) with a mean age of 45 years (range, 18-81 years) completed the survey. Overall, time to return to unrestricted activities and residual pain were considered very important to the majority of the respondents, while the size and appearance of surgical scars were of little importance. Prior shoulder pain (ρ = –0.17; P =.01) and prior shoulder surgery (ρ = –0.16; P =.03) correlated to concern about time to return to unrestricted activities. Younger age (ρ = –0.11; P =.04) and a higher level of education (ρ = 0.14; P =.03) correlated with greater concern for time to return to work. Women and African Americans were more concerned about the size and appearance of surgical scars (ρ = –0.28; P <.0001 and ρ = –0.20; P =.0002, respectively) and biceps deformity. Respondents with a higher activity level (ρ = 0.20; P =.0002) and men (ρ = 0.11; P =.04) were more concerned about fatigue. Conclusion: Concerns about residual pain, time to return to unrestricted activities, and time away from work are important to patients when considering the treatment for shoulder lesions. Patient preferences are associated with age, sex, race, and shoulder activity level. These features should be considered when discussing treatment options for shoulder and proximal biceps tendon disorders.

Original languageEnglish
JournalOrthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume6
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Keywords

  • biceps treatment
  • patient preference information
  • return to activity
  • shoulder treatment

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