Obstructive sleep apnea decreases central nervous system–derived proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid

Yo El S. Ju, Mary Beth Finn, Courtney L. Sutphen, Elizabeth M. Herries, Gina M. Jerome, Jack H. Ladenson, Daniel L. Crimmins, Anne M. Fagan, David M. Holtzman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

We hypothesized that one mechanism underlying the association between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and Alzheimer's disease is OSA leading to decreased slow wave activity (SWA), increased synaptic activity, decreased glymphatic clearance, and increased amyloid-β. Polysomnography and lumbar puncture were performed in OSA and control groups. SWA negatively correlated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-β-40 among controls and was decreased in the OSA group. Unexpectedly, amyloid-β-40 was decreased in the OSA group. Other neuronally derived proteins, but not total protein, were also decreased in the OSA group, suggesting that OSA may affect the interaction between interstitial and cerebrospinal fluid. Ann Neurol 2016;80:154–159.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-159
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of neurology
Volume80
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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