Numerical study of aerodynamic performance of airfoils at low angles of attack by active flow control of trailing edge vortices

J. L. Vadillo, R. K. Agarwal

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recently, it has been shown experimentally by DeSalvo and Glezer 1 that the aerodynamic performance of an airfoil at low angles of attack in subsonic flow can be enhanced by leveraging the presence of a small fixed flap Integrated with a synthetic jet actuator. The flap is similar in some respects to a conventional Gurney flap with a characteristic length of 0.017c and is mounted on the pressure side of the airfoil near its trailing edge. By using a synthetic jet actuator integrated with the flap, it is possible to have additional leverage of the presence of trapped vortices that are Induced by the flap near the trailing edge to further manipulate the flow near the trailing edge and thereby achieve global modifications to the pressure on the airfoil. It was shown experimentally that when the control jet was activated, the aerodynamic performance of the airfoil could be significantly Improved to achieve a higher lift to pressure drag ratio. In this paper, we study this experimentally observed phenomenon by numerical simulation using Unsteady Reynolds-Averaged Navler-Stokes (URANS) equations In conjunction with a two-equation Shear Stress Transport (SST) model.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCollection of Technical Papers - 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting
Pages12702-12721
Number of pages20
StatePublished - 2006
Event44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting 2006 - Reno, NV, United States
Duration: Jan 9 2006Jan 12 2006

Publication series

NameCollection of Technical Papers - 44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting
Volume17

Conference

Conference44th AIAA Aerospace Sciences Meeting 2006
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityReno, NV
Period01/9/0601/12/06

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