Neural correlates of error monitoring in adolescents prospectively predict initiation of tobacco use

Andrey P. Anokhin, Simon Golosheykin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Deficits in self-regulation of behavior can play an important role in the initiation of substance use and progression to regular use and dependence. One of the distinct component processes of self-regulation is error monitoring, i.e. detection of a conflict between the intended and actually executed action. Here we examined whether a neural marker of error monitoring, Error-Related Negativity (ERN), predicts future initiation of tobacco use. ERN was assessed in a prospective longitudinal sample at ages 12, 14, and 16 using a flanker task. ERN amplitude showed a significant increase with age during adolescence. Reduced ERN amplitude at ages 14 and 16, as well as slower rate of its developmental changes significantly predicted initiation of tobacco use by age 18 but not transition to regular tobacco use or initiation of marijuana and alcohol use. The present results suggest that attenuated development of the neural mechanisms of error monitoring during adolescence can increase the risk for initiation of tobacco use. The present results also suggest that the role of distinct neurocognitive component processes involved in behavioral regulation may be limited to specific stages of addiction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)166-173
Number of pages8
JournalDevelopmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume16
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • ERN
  • Error monitoring
  • Longitudinal
  • Substance use
  • Tobacco

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