National Pancreatic Fistula Rates after Minimally Invasive Pancreaticoduodenectomy: A NSQIP Analysis

Roheena Z. Panni, Jarot Guerra, William G. Hawkins, Bruce L. Hall, Horacio J. Asbun, Dominic E. Sanford

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: There is a substantial learning curve associated with minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy (MIPD). We sought to determine if national MIPD pancreatic fistula rates are decreasing with time. Study Design: All patients undergoing elective MIPD and accrued into the pancreatectomy-targeted NSQIP database between 2014 and 2017 were included in the study. Trends in MIPD outcomes by year were examined using Cochran-Armitage and Mann-Kendall tests for trend. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess for an independent association between increasing year of operation and pancreatic fistula. Results: There were 1,096 patients who underwent MIPD between 2014 and 2017. There was a significant trend toward decreasing pancreatic fistula rates (23.6% vs 19.2% vs 14.9% vs 12.7%, p < 0.01) and clinically relevant pancreatic fistula rates (18.3% vs 15.4% vs 11.1% vs 9.1%, p < 0.01) by increasing year. In multivariable analysis, increasing year of operation was independently protective against pancreatic fistula (odds ratio [OR] 0.76 per year, p < 0.01) and clinically relevant pancreatic fistula (OR 0.73 per year, p < 0.01). Patients without pancreas ducts < 3 mm or soft pancreas gland texture experienced a significant decreasing trend in pancreatic fistula rates (23.7% vs 13.2% vs 10.3% vs 8.0%, p < 0.01) and clinically relevant pancreatic fistula rates (18.3% vs 9.1% vs 5.2% vs 6.0%, p < 0.01), respectively, by increasing year. However, there was not a significant trend in pancreatic fistula rate or clinically relevant fistula rate among patients having either pancreas ducts < 3 mm or soft gland texture. Conclusions: National MIPD pancreatic fistula rates are improving with time. A major contributing factor for this finding is better outcomes in patients who are at lower risk of pancreatic fistula, which could be a reflection of evolving minimally invasive anastomotic techniques.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)192-199.e1
JournalJournal of the American College of Surgeons
Volume229
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2019

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