NADPH oxidase limits collaborative pattern-recognition receptor signaling to regulate neutrophil cytokine production in response to fungal pathogen-associated molecular patterns

Dae Goon Yoo, Luana C. Paracatu, Evan Xu, Xin Lin, Mary C. Dinauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by genetic defects in leukocyte NADPH oxidase, which has both microbicidal and immunomodulatory roles. Hence, CGD is characterized by recurrent bacterial and fungal infections as well as aberrant inflammation. Fungal cell walls induce neutrophilic inflammation in CGD; yet, underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. This study investigated the receptors and signaling pathways driving aberrant proinflammatory cytokine production in CGD neutrophils activated by fungal cell walls. Although cytokine responses to β-glucan particles were similar in NADPH oxidase-competent and NADPH oxidase-deficient mouse and human neutrophils, stimulation with zymosan, a more complex fungal particle, induced elevated cytokine production in NADPH oxidase-deficient neutrophils. The dectin-1 C-type lectin receptor, which recognizes β-glucans (1-3), and TLRs mediated cytokine responses by wild-type murine neutrophils. In the absence of NADPH oxidase, fungal pathogen-associated molecular patterns engaged additional collaborative signaling with Mac-1 and TLRs to markedly increase cytokine production. Mechanistically, this cytokine overproduction is mediated by enhanced proximal activation of tyrosine phosphatase SHP2-Syk and downstream Card9- dependent NF-κB and Card9-independent JNK-c-Jun. This activation and amplified cytokine production were significantly decreased by exogenous H2O2 treatment, enzymatic generation of exogenous H2O2, or Mac-1 blockade. Similar to zymosan, Aspergillus fumigatus conidia induced increased signaling in CGD mouse neutrophils for activation of proinflammatory cytokine production, which also used Mac-1 and was Card9 dependent. This study, to our knowledge, provides new insights into how NADPH oxidase deficiency deregulates neutrophil cytokine production in response to fungal cell walls.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)93-937
Number of pages845
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume207
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2021

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