Multitasking by the OC Lineage during Bone Infection: Bone Resorption, Immune Modulation, and Microbial Niche

Philip M. Roper, Christine Shao, Deborah J. Veis

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Bone infections, also known as infectious osteomyelitis, are accompanied by significant inflammation, osteolysis, and necrosis. Osteoclasts (OCs) are the bone-resorbing cells that work in concert with osteoblasts and osteocytes to properly maintain skeletal health and are well known to respond to inflammation by increasing their resorptive activity. OCs have typically been viewed merely as effectors of pathologic bone resorption, but recent evidence suggests they may play an active role in the progression of infections through direct effects on pathogens and via the immune system. This review discusses the host- and pathogen-derived factors involved in the in generation of OCs during infection, the crosstalk between OCs and immune cells, and the role of OC lineage cells in the growth and survival of pathogens, and highlights unanswered questions in the field.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCells
Volume9
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 24 2020

Keywords

  • Porphyromonas gingivalis
  • Staphylococcus aureus
  • bone
  • macrophage
  • neutrophil
  • osteoclast
  • osteomyelitis

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