Movement-pattern training to improve function in people with chronic hip joint pain: A feasibility randomized clinical trial

Marcie Harris-Hayes, Sylvia Czuppon, Linda R. Van Dillen, Karen Steger-May, Shirley Sahrmann, Mario Schootman, Gretchen B. Salsich, John C. Clohisy, Michael J. Mueller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN: Feasibility randomized clinical trial. BACKGROUND: Rehabilitation may be an appropriate treatment strategy for patients with chronic hip joint pain; however, the evidence related to the effectiveness of rehabilitation is limited. OBJECTIVES: To assess feasibility of performing a randomized clinical trial to investigate the effectiveness of movement-pattern training (MPT) to improve function in people with chronic hip joint pain. METHODS: Thirty-five patients with chronic hip joint pain were randomized into a treatment (MPT) group or a control (wait-list) group. The MPT program included 6 one-hour supervised sessions and incorporated (1) task-specific training for basic functional tasks and symptom-provoking tasks, and (2) strengthening of hip musculature. The wait-list group received no treatment. Primary outcomes for feasibility were patient retention and adherence. Secondary outcomes to assess treatment effects were patient-reported function (Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score), lower extremity kinematics, and hip muscle strength. RESULTS: Retention rates did not differ between the MPT (89%) and wait-list groups (94%, P = 1.0). Sixteen of the 18 patients (89%) in the MPT group attended at least 80% of the treatment sessions. For the home exercise program, 89% of patients reported performing their home program at least once per day. Secondary outcomes support the rationale for conduct of a superiority randomized clinical trial. CONCLUSION: Based on retention and adherence rates, a larger randomized clinical trial appears feasible and warranted to assess treatment effects more precisely. Data from this feasibility study will inform our future clinical trial.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)452-461
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2016

Keywords

  • Femoroacetabular impingement
  • Hip dysplasia
  • Kinematics
  • Movement system
  • Strength

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