Movement pattern training compared with standard strengthening and flexibility among patients with hip-related groin pain: Results of a pilot multicentre randomised clinical trial

Marcie Harris-Hayes, Karen Steger-May, Allyn M. Bove, Stefanie N. Foster, Michael J. Mueller, John C. Clohisy, G. Kelley Fitzgerald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Study design: Pilot, multicentre randomised clinical trial (RCT). Objectives: Assess viability of performing a definitive RCT and compare preliminary effects of movement pattern training (MoveTrain) and strengthening/flexibility (Standard) to improve function in people with chronic hip-related groin pain (HRGP). Background: To determine the best physical therapist-led intervention for patients with HRGP, we must understand treatment effects of different treatment modes. Methods: Forty-six patients (17M:29F; 29±5.3 years; body mass index 25.6±6.3 kg/m 2) with HRGP were randomised. MoveTrain included task-specific training to optimise biomechanics during daily tasks. Standard included strengthening/flexibility. Treatment included 10 visits/12 weeks and home exercise programme (HEP). Primary outcomes for feasibility were recruitment, retention, treatment adherence and treatment fidelity. Secondary outcomes were patient-reported function (Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (HOOS)), lower extremity kinematics and hip muscle strength. Results: We achieved target recruitment, and retention was excellent (91%). Patient session attendance was high (93%); however, reported HEP adherence (62%) was lower than expected. Physical therapists' adherence to treatment protocols was high (90%). Patients demonstrated high treatment receipt; 91% of exercises performed were rated independent. Both groups demonstrated clinically important improvements in function (HOOS) and muscle strength; however, there were no between-group differences (HOOS subscales, p≥0.13, strength, p≥0.34). Compared with Standard, MoveTrain demonstrated greater reductions in hip adduction (p=0.016) and pelvic drop (p=0.026) during a single leg squat. No adverse events were noted. Conclusion: Our experience in completing this RCT confirmed that a larger, multicentre RCT is feasible and highlighted modifications we will implement to optimise the future RCT.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere000707
JournalBMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 23 2020

Keywords

  • biomechanics
  • hip
  • rehabilitation
  • strength isometric isokinetic

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