Mortality and Length of Stay Trends Following Implementation of a Rapid Response System and Real-Time Automated Clinical Deterioration Alerts

Marin H. Kollef, Kevin Heard, Yixin Chen, Chenyang Lu, Nelda Martin, Thomas Bailey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

A study was performed to determine the potential influence of a rapid response system (RRS) employing real-time clinical deterioration alerts (RTCDAs) on patient outcomes involving 8 general medicine units. Introduction of the RRS occurred in 2006 with staged addition of the RTCDAs in 2009. Statistically significant year-to-year decreases in mortality were observed through 2014 (r = −.794; P =.002). Similarly, year-to-year decreases in the number of cardiopulmonary arrests (CPAs; r = −.792; P =.006) and median lengths of stay (r = −.841; P =.001) were observed. There was a statistically significant year-to-year increase in the number of RRS activations for these units (r =.939; P <.001) that was inversely correlated with the occurrence of CPAs (r = −.784; P =.007). In this single-institution retrospective study, introduction of a RRS employing RTCDAs was associated with lower hospital mortality, CPAs, and hospital length of stay.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)12-18
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Quality
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Keywords

  • clinical deterioration alert
  • hospital length of stay
  • morbidity and mortality
  • rapid response system

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