More Than Poverty: The Effect of Child Abuse and Neglect on Teen Pregnancy Risk

Sarah K. Garwood, Lara Gerassi, Melissa Jonson-Reid, Katie Plax, Brett Drake

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of the study was to compare risk for teen pregnancies between children living in poverty with no child protective services (CPS) report history and those in poverty with a history of CPS report. Methods Children selected from families in poverty, both with and without CPS report histories were prospectively followed from 1993 to 2009 using electronic administrative records from agencies including CPS, emergency departments, Medicaid services, and juvenile courts. A total of 3,281 adolescent females were followed until the age of 18 years. Results For teens with history of poverty only, 16.8% had been pregnant at least once by the age of 17 years. In teens with history of both poverty and report of child abuse or neglect, 28.9% had been pregnant at least once by the age of 17 years. Although multivariate survival analyses revealed several other significant factors at the family and youth services levels, a report of maltreatment remained significant (about a 66% higher risk). Conclusions Maltreatment is a significant risk factor for teen pregnancy among low income youth even after controlling for neighborhood disadvantage, other caregiver risks and indicators of individual emotional and behavioral problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)164-168
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Keywords

  • Child abuse and neglect
  • Health disparity
  • Poverty
  • Prospective study
  • Unplanned pregnancy

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'More Than Poverty: The Effect of Child Abuse and Neglect on Teen Pregnancy Risk'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this