Monocyte migration explains the changes in macrophage arachidonate metabolism during the immune response

C. S. Tripp, E. R. Unanue, P. Needleman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

The profile of arachidonic acid metabolites in resident peritoneal macrophages is distinctly different from the profile of macrophages isolated after an acute bacterial infection. The latter produce decreased prostaglandins E2 and I2 and leukotriene C4 while conserving the synthesis of thromboxane A2. We show here that the initial changes in peritoneal macrophage arachidonate metabolism during the immune response appear to be the result of the large influx of blood monocytes, which have a characteristic metabolism distinct from resident macrophages. We demonstrate that the initial decrease in peritoneal macrophage arachidonate metabolism and the increase in macrophage numbers occur simultaneously after infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Also the macrophage arachidonate metabolism seen at the height of the peritoneal cellular influx is the same as that of purified blood monocytes. Both Listeria peritoneal macrophages and blood monocytes produce equal or greater quantities of thromboxane A2 relative to prostaglandins I2 and E2 or leukotriene C4 whereas resident cells produce 1/10 to 1/25 as much thromboxane A2 compared to the other products. Furthermore, the changes in peritoneal macrophage arachidonate metabolism in response to Listeria infection do not occur if the influx of blood monocytes is stopped by irradiating the mice prior to infection implying that the cellular influx is necessary to see the changes in arachidonate metabolism. Finally, activation of peritoneal macrophages, measured as an increase in Ia expression, occurs 36 hr after the influx of monocytes from the blood and the resultant shift in arachidonate metabolism during Listeria infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9655-9659
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume83
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

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