Modification of host cell phagosomes by Toxoplasma gondii involves redistribution of surface proteins and secretion of a 32 kDa protein.

L. D. Sibley, J. L. Krahenbuhl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

40 Scopus citations

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii resists endocytic processing within host cell phagosomes that are modified by a prominent membranous network which forms the interface between host cell and the enclosed parasite. The formation of this intravacuolar network involves redistribution of the major outer membrane proteins of the Toxoplasma cell, consisting of 41, 35, 29, 22 kDa species, as shown by radioimmunoprecipitation, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and immunogold EM labeling using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to T. gondii. In addition, the major 32 kDa protein found in the purified intravacuolar networks was recognized by mAb 1G5 which does not react with the surface of intact Toxoplasma cells. Immunoperoxidase EM using mAb 1G5 indicated that the 32 kDa protein is a constituent of electron-dense vacuoles within the Toxoplasma cell, in addition to being a prominent component of the intravacuolar network. Thus, assembly of the intravacuolar network appears to involve regulated release of the 32 kDa protein in conjunction with shedding of surface membrane proteins by the parasite. Our results suggest that the structural modifications of host cell phagosomes by T. gondii are precisely regulated events that follow invasion and consequently may contribute to intracellular survival.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-87
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean journal of cell biology
Volume47
Issue number1
StatePublished - Oct 1988

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