Minority Stress and Intimate Partner Violence Among Gay and Bisexual Men in Atlanta

Rob Stephenson, Catherine Finneran

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

79 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intimate partner violence (IPV) rates are disproportionately high among sexual minority populations. Few studies have examined the plausible relationship between minority stress and IPV among men who have sex with men. This study examines the associations between IPV and three indicators of minority stress: internalized homophobia, sexuality-based discrimination, and racism, in a large venue-based sample of gay and bisexual men from Atlanta, USA. Each of the minority stress measures was found to be significantly associated with increased odds of self-reporting any form of receipt of IPV. Significant associations were also identified between perpetration of IPV and minority stressors, with most types of IPV perpetration linked to internalized homophobia. This study confirms findings in a growing body of research supporting the relationship between minority stress and increased prevalence of IPV among men who have sex with men, and points to the need to address structural factors in IPV prevention programs for male–male couples.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)952-961
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Men's Health
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

Keywords

  • intimate partner violence
  • minority stress
  • MSM

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